Jobs

Postdoctoral Fellow

Employer

Indiana University

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Principal Investigator

Gary Landreth

Principal Investigator

Bruce Lamb, Stephanie Bissel

Contact

sbissel@iu.edu

Description

The Lamb Lab at Stark Neurosciences Research Institute seeks an exceptional and creative individual who will lead a research project focused on dissecting the role of PLCG2 variants on microglial responses during the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Anticipated approaches for this project will involve using new murine models of Alzheimer’s disease, applying cutting-edge multi-omic methods, cognitive phenotyping, in addition to cellular and molecular biological approaches.

The incumbent will be appointed as a member of the Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics but will be reside in the Stark Neurosciences Research Institute (SNRI), which has a strong group of researchers studying neurodegenerative diseases. The lab fosters a vibrant and supportive environment, using multidisciplinary approaches with strong collaborations within SNRI as well as with investigators at other renowned institutions. The successful candidate will have a demonstrated strong track record of research and communication skills, be self-directed and highly motivated with support from PIs, organized, and be capable of working collaboratively within a team.

This fellowship is an excellent opportunity to work independently on a high-impact project in a dynamic research environment using state-of-the-art techniques.

Requirements

Doctorate or terminal degree required. A recent Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. with a strong background in relevant fields such as neuroscience and immunology. Successful candidates will have a strong track record of peer-reviewed publications and excellent verbal and written communications.

Experience in maintaining mouse colonies, mouse neuropathology, microscopy, molecular biology, cell culture, and gene-expression profiling is preferred but not required. Prior experience in Alzheimer’s disease or related neurological disease research is also beneficial.