. Imaging hippocampal function across the human life span: is memory decline normal or not?. Ann Neurol. 2002 Mar;51(3):290-5. PubMed.

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  1. Another way to tell aging from pathology (ad and other neurodegenerative conditions?)

  2. I am aware of significant memory loss in the last 5 years. I'm 55 now and will get tested for AD should the opportunity arise. The fact that my mom has AD helps compels me to find out as much as possible as soon as possible about this disease. I'm her primary care giver also.

    Can we delevope drugs that starve off age related memory loss? I couldn't begin to answer that question. Should we? Seems like a no brainer to me, of course we should.

  3. I am a woman of 82 years old, in a genetic Alzheimer's family. There have been about 10 such cases known to me so far, including my sister, three first-cousins, my mother, her four siblings, and my grandmother.

    When I took a test for Alzheimer's about 10 years ago, my condition was diagnosed as "non-definitive" or being an "amnesiatic condition." The reason stated, although my considerable problem with the memory portions of the test was acknowledged, was that my lifelong memory difficulty was not a recognized AD symptom.

    I was not aware until two years later, when I was diagnosed with celiac disease, that gluten has caused this lifelong problem, which has now greatly multiplied with every senior year. My gene tests also indicate that both my mother and sister have this celiac gene as well, and with about 11 other offspring tested so far, five more have tested positive for CD.

    I live in a senior development with about 150 seniors. At least four are friends who have been diagnosed with dementia. I suspect that my being gluten-free for seven years may be preserving my normal cognitive ability, as my lack of memory clearly matches that of these neighbors.

    I appreciate the question about memory loss being a disease or natural with age. Although mine has been proven a disease result initially, the fact of increasing age deterioration matches that of almost all seniors I've known here for seven years.

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