(From Nature press release.) It is now generally
accepted that new neurons are generated in the adult mammalian brain,
but until now it has been unclear whether or not these neurons are
essential for memory formation. This week [in Nature], Tracey Shors of
Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey, and colleagues present
evidence that the addition of new neurons to the hippocampus of adult
rats is essential for at least one form of memory-the kind concerning
the timing of learned responses, and temporal relationships between
events. "The results support the idea that it might, one day, be
possible to add new, fully functional neurons into existing brain
circuitry to treat diseases of the nervous system," says Jeffrey D.
Macklis of Harvard Medical School in an
accompanying News and Views article.

References: Shors TJ, Miesegaes G, Beylin A, Zhao MG, Rydel T, Gould E. Neurogenesis in the adult is involved in the formation of trace memories. Nature. 2001 Mar 15;410(6826):372-6. Erratum in: Nature 2001 Dec 20-27;414(6866):938. Abstract

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Paper Citations

  1. . Neurogenesis in the adult is involved in the formation of trace memories. Nature. 2001 Mar 15;410(6826):372-6. PubMed.

Further Reading

Papers

  1. . Neurogenesis in the adult is involved in the formation of trace memories. Nature. 2001 Mar 15;410(6826):372-6. PubMed.

Primary Papers

  1. . Neurogenesis in the adult is involved in the formation of trace memories. Nature. 2001 Mar 15;410(6826):372-6. PubMed.